Jeff Wolf Contractor, LLC - Specializing in wet/flooded basement repair (water intrusion) and structural/foundation repairs

Call Jeff @ 608-239-0971Jeff Wolf Contractor, LLC - Wet basement, structural & foundation repair

Radon Diagnostic Testing and Mitigation Systems

Radon Reduction Techniques

There are several methods that a contractor can use to lower radon levels in your home.

Radon is usually reduced by one of four types of soil suction: subslab suction, drain tile suction, sump hole suction, or block wall suction. Repair of foundation cracks and openings is also recommended.

Some techniques prevent radon from entering your home while others reduce radon levels after it has entered. EPA generally recommends methods which prevent the entry of radon.

  • Active subslab suction (also called subslab depressurization) is the most common and usually the most reliable radon reduction method. One or more suction pipes are inserted through the floor slab into the crushed rock or soil underneath. They also may be inserted below the concrete slab from outside the house. The number and location of suction pipes that are needed depends on how easily air can move in the crushed rock or soil under the slab, and on the strength of the radon source. Often, only a single suction point is needed.

    A radon vent fan connected to the suction pipe(s) draws the radon gas from below the house and releases it into the outdoor air while simultaneously creating a negative pressure (vacuum) beneath the slab. Common fan locations include unconditioned house and garage spaces, including attics, and the exterior of the house.

  • Passive subslab suction is the same as active subslab suction except it relies on natural pressure differentials and air currents instead of a fan to draw radon up from below the house. Passive subslab suction is usually associated with radon-resistant features installed in newly constructed homes. Passive subslab suction is generally not as effective in reducing high radon levels as active subslab suction.

  • Soil suction, for example, prevents radon from entering your home by drawing the radon from below the house and venting it through a pipe, or pipes, to the air above the house where it is quickly diluted.

  • Some houses have drain tiles or perforated pipe to direct water away from the foundation of the house. Suction on these tiles or pipes is often effective in reducing radon levels.

  • One variation of subslab and drain tile suction is sump hole suction. Often, when a house with a basement has a sump pump to remove unwanted water, the sump can be capped so that it can continue to drain water and serve as the location for a radon suction pipe.

  • Block wall suction can be used in basement houses with hollow block foundation walls. This method removes radon and depressurizes the block wall, similar to subslab suction. This method is often used in combination with subslab suction.

We can perform a visual inspection of your house and design a radon reduction system for your home.

Mitigation technique descriptions from the EPA Consumer Guide

We now accept these charge cards:

Visa   MasterCard